Letters to the Editor

May 19, 2017
By

I enjoyed the article

Dear Editor:

I very much enjoyed reading the May 4 article about the Preservation Month event at the old State House. I would like to clarify, and add to, a part of my interview with the Patriot-Bridge. The neighbor from whom I learned of the Charlestown architectural survey is Virginia Creaser who, with her late husband, Dick, were founding members of the Charlestown Preservation Society. They wrote a series of excellent articles in the old Charlestown Patriot describing their research into Charlestown architectural history. The architectural historian who did the original house-by-house description and research is Ed Gordon.

Rob Dinsmore

Main Street

On the parade route

Dear Editor:

First and foremost, thank you to the Parade Committee for all of their hard work.  Without you, there is no parade.

However, I must say that I was very disappointed to learn that the parade route was changed without any community input.  I understand the reasons behind the changes, but I feel bad for all of the families along the “traditional” route that will no longer be able to enjoy the parade in the same way.  Many families start planning for the parade months in advance.  It was disheartening to learn of such a major change just a month before the parade.  I love the parade and I hope the changes are beneficial, but for me and my neighbors, the parade will never be the same.

Kevin Broderick

On changing the parade route

Dear Editor,

It’s too bad that the Bunker Hill Parade will no longer pass by our house at the corner of Union and Washington Streets, where we’ve held a garage party celebration for several years on parade day–kids dancing in the street as politicians grabbed their cold beer at Old Sully’s (“Bunker Hill Parade route to he shortened–PB, May 11, 2017).

Here’s a little limerick and picture for the records:

This week when they shortened the parade route,

Townie and Toonie traditions lost out:

At Old Sullys, a cold beer,

At our garage, a kids’ cheer,

But Colonel Prescott hasn’t lost his clout. .