Warren-Prescott Expands Autism and Science Programs

January 31, 2013
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As a never-ending goal to create additional educational opportunities for all students in Warren-Prescott, Principal Michele Davis has brought in some heavy hitters in the fields of science and special education.  This year, autism behavioral specialists will be among the staff at the Warren-Prescott to establish additional readiness skills for all children with autism enrolled at Warren-Prescott.  In addition, acclaimed scientists from Massachusetts will be working with students in grades 4-8 to enhance technology and science curriculum as well as enhance science and technology curriculum.

Applied behavior specialists from the New England Center for Children (NECC), a non-profit research and education center, will be working closely with students, teachers and parents in the autism program to improve readiness skills for general education curriculum, build better social cues and encourage new methods of teaching children with autism.

Dedicated in transforming the lives of children with autism through education, research and technology, NECC is providing essential skills for Warren-Prescott’s autistic community based on proven teaching methods and over 35 years of research and practice.  NECC has created the Autism Curriculum Encyclopedia (ACE) which is an interactive database containing assessment tools, lesson plans, teaching materials, and student performance reports for more than 1,300 skills drawn from curriculum used at NECC.

Improving science and technology skills among elementary and middle school students is becoming an essential goal for all of our nation’s youth in public schools.  Warren-Prescott has stepped up their efforts by introducing programs from Boston-based Science from Scientists (SfS), non-profit firm striving to improve science and technology awareness in today’s schools.  SfS typically works with more than 24 schools, roughly 2,000 students annually, to instruct children based on Massachusetts STEM framework curriculum, or Science, Technology, Engineering & Math.  STEM standards were developed based on Governor Deval Patrick’s STEM Advisory Council, created to ensure that all students are educated in STEM fields, enabling them to pursue post-secondary degrees or careers in these areas.

“We’re very lucky that our school is located in a hotbed of science, research and technology companies as well as campuses of higher learning, such as MIT,” said Principal Michele Davis.  “What better way to learn science than to learn it from actual scientists.”