Sinking Wind Turbine is Troubling

March 1, 2012
By

The Massachusetts Water Resource Authority’s new wind turbine in Charlestown has apparently sunk about 2 inches causing significant worry that the structural integrity of the 426,000 pound turbine is at risk.

The turbine, which rises 364 feet into the air at the tip of its extended blades, has a foundation 25 feet deep and 5 feet across. It cost $4.7 million to build and has not been generating electricity since the beginning of January.

MWRA authorities have declared there is no danger of the turbine falling over or taking on a lean but that the rate of sinkage experienced and noted is of concern.

The 231 ton turbine stands on land occupied by the DeLauri Sewer Pump Station off Route 99 – where the Charlestown/Boston demarcation line is shared with Everett near to the Mystic River.

The towering wind turbine is impossible to miss for all those traveling into Boston from Everett and out of Boston into Everett on Rt. 99.

Lumus Construction built the turbine, which is a state of the art green-energy venue.

City Councillor Sal LaMattina, who represents Charlestown, told the Patriot-Bridge that he was certain the turbine’s foundation would be repaired. He said he had been told the shoring up of the soil the turbine’s foundation is built on will begin next week.

Officials said grout will most likely be injected into the foundation area to make it more firm.

“I support projects like these because this is what we need to be doing to become energy independent,” said LaMattina. “It is projects like this one that help us to generate electricity without having to pay for energy to drive the turbine itself. This is the way to go. Wind generated power is about the future,” he said.

The MWRA sells electricity generated by the Charlestown wind turbine when it is running to the Deer Island sewage treatment plant.

The blades for the turbine were produced in China and sent by boat to the US and off-loaded in Chelsea and then trucked to Charlestown.

MWRA officials did not know exactly why the rate of sinkage has been so great except to surmise that soil conditions and vibrations from a sudden shutdown triggered by high winds might be the causes.

  • ytreggah

    The Charlestown wind turbine was to go back into service on March 16,2012.  The newspapers and the MWRA news updates have been telling the public the turbine will be fixed next week and then again next week .We have been told weeks ago that concrete will be pumped around the base of the turbine -as of today that still has not happened !

    Bolts came out of the ground nine inches long as a result of a sudden shutdown during a period of mild winds . Now we are being told the turbine will return to service at half speed for the future – Let’s get a real update on this turbine – It’s never going to run the way the taxpayers paid for it to run –

    This was the first wind turbine that this developer installed and it’s not working – The contractor has built another one in Scituate and two in Fairhaven – how about the Attorney General looking into how the bases of these turbines are being built ?

    • Chdgroup

      Opinions are more valuable when one has sufficient comprehension of the topic and accurate information. It appears that based on what you have written that you have neither. I would recommend understanding the subject matter better prior to posting an uneducated opinion. Sharing inacurate information does none of us any good.